Imagining A More Active Moon

The standard picture of the moon is of a long-dead object, geologically speaking. But using observations from cameras on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Thomas Watters and colleagues say in the journal Nature Geosciences that there are signs of more recent tectonic activity on the moon, within the last 50 million years.

Segment Guests

Thomas R. Watters

Thomas R. Watters is a senior scientist at the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Meet the Producer

About Charles Bergquist

As Science Friday’s director, Charles Bergquist channels the chaos of a live production studio into something sounding like a radio program. Favorite topics include┬áplanetary sciences, chemistry, materials, and shiny things with blinking lights.