11/02/2012

Seeing Sandy From Space

 

NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of the massive Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 28 at 1302 UTC (9:02 a.m. EDT). The line of clouds from the Gulf of Mexico north are associated with the cold front that Sandy is merging with. Sandy's western cloud edge is already over the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern U.S. Image courtesy of NASA GOES Project
NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of the massive Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 28 at 1302 UTC (9:02 a.m. EDT). The line of clouds from the Gulf of Mexico north are associated with the cold front that Sandy is merging with. Sandy’s western cloud edge is already over the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern U.S. Image courtesy of NASA GOES Project

What does satellite imagery reveal about Hurricane Sandy? Owen Kelley at NASA is using satellite data to visualize the internal structure of the storm and Marshall Shepherd, president-elect of the American Meteorological Society and the director of the atmospheric sciences program at the University of Georgia, discusses what made this storm so unusual.

Segment Guests

Flora Lichtman

Flora Lichtman is host of The Adaptors podcast and former SciFri multimedia producer in New York, New York.

J. Marshall Shepherd

J. Marshall Shepherd is host of Weather Geeks and director of the Program in Atmospheric Sciences at University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia.