10/18/2019

How ‘Proactive Policing’ Might Impact Health

23:15 minutes

police car's red and blue lights shining at night in street
Credit: Shutterstock

In the 1980s and 1990s, in the midst of rising crime rates and a nationally waning confidence in policing, law enforcement around the country adopted a different approach to addressing crime. Instead of just reacting to crime when it happened, officers decided they’d try to prevent it from happening in the first place, employing things like “hot spots” policing and “stop and frisk,” or “terry stops.” The strategy is what criminologists call proactive policing, and it’s now become widely used in police departments across the nation, especially in cities. 

Critics and experts debate how effective these tactics are in lowering crime rates. While there’s some evidence that proactive policing does reduce crime, now public health researchers are questioning if the practice—which sometimes results in innocent people being stopped, searched, and detained—comes with other unintended physical and mental health consequences. 

Samuel Walker, emeritus professor of criminology at the University of Nebraska Omaha and an expert in police accountability, reviews what led police departments to adopt a more proactive approach, while medical sociologist Alyasah Ali Sewell explains the physical and mental health impacts of stop-question-and-frisk policing.


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Segment Guests

Samuel Walker

Samuel Walker is an emeritus professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska Omaha in Omaha, Nebraska.

Alyasah Ali Sewell

Alyasah Ali Sewell is an associate professor of Sociology at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

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