Episodes

Episode

September 21, 2018

We find out what it’s like to step into a paleontologist’s boots and discover some dino gold. Plus, efforts to preserve some species in Hawaii found nowhere else on Earth.

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Episode

September 14, 2018

Algorithms can influence so much more than what’s on your social media feed, like who gets parole. Plus, scientists can now see how one leaf talks to another—in real time.

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Episode

September 7, 2018

How strong is the human-robot bond? How do you know how to relate to a mechanical device? We talk robot relationships. Plus, how do we navigate our work-life boundaries?

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Episode

August 31, 2018

NASA is exploring a deep-sea volcano near Hawaii as a test run for human and robotic missions to Mars and beyond. Plus, how technology is changing our relationship with death.

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Episode

August 24, 2018

The SciFri Book Club closes the book on the Stephen Hawking classic, "A Brief History of Time." Plus, research into real-time tracking of viral infections, and a look at probiotics.

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Episode

August 17, 2018

The Army is investigating sea barriers to protect New York from a future Sandy. But others have doubts. Plus, the discovery that a methane-burping microbe was not a bacterium added a new branch to the tree of life: The Archaea.

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Episode

August 10, 2018

Each year, we use nearly 50 billion tons of sand and gravel worldwide. Is that sustainable? Plus, a statistician developed an algorithm to figure out who wrote disputed Beatles songs.

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Episode

August 3, 2018

Physicists are still trying to prove decades-old theories, but some argue the best answers may not from beautiful math. Plus, Alan Alda discusses his diagnosis with Parkinson’s.

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Episode

July 27, 2018

Just how and why do city mice and country mice diverge? Plus, scientists found that a gene plays a role in determining what ant becomes a queen in a colony.

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Episode

July 20, 2018

What does heredity actually mean? Carl Zimmer brings up to speed. Plus, scientists simulated a prehistoric atmosphere to deduce how much dinos actually ate.

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